Declarative Statements

Posted by on Jul 21, 2013 in Thesis

In response to feedback from my thesis committee, I am re-thinking how I will present my work to an uninitiated audience. Part of this process is creating three declarative statements that will help me strategically foreground and background the details of my design research.

DeclarativeStatements_v9:
Socially inclusive design demands oscillation between working from the field, with its actual people and constraints, and studio, with its tools, history, and critique. Each mode comes with a disparate set of methods, imaginaries, and expectations. By strategically using these modes to critique and build off one another, designers produce work that would have been unimaginable if pursued through only one mode.

Market-driven and dominant NGO ICT4D strategies are skewed in favor of those who are positioned a certain way in society, whether through wealth, race, gender, or skills. Ugandan women often do not share the same wealth, mobility, and digital and textual literacy of their male counterparts. Designing ICT4D for Ugandan women needs to start from their ambitions, priorities, and daily context.

ICT4D often starts with both the development technique and outcome pre-determined. Designing for Ugandan women requires a different design approach, one that is responsive; open to switching trajectories; explores women’s daily experience; extends from their perspectives; and builds upon the networks women are already creating for themselves.

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DeclarativeStatements_v7:
Socially inclusive design demands oscillation between working from the field and studio. Designing from the field vs the studio carries drastically different methods, imaginaries, and expectations. By artfully playing these modes off one another, designers produce work that would have been unimaginable if pursued through only one mode.

Market-driven and dominant ICT4D strategies are skewed in favor of those who are positioned a certain way in society, whether through wealth, race, gender, or skills. Designing ICT4D for Ugandan women needs to start from their ambitions, priorities, and daily context.

ICT4D often starts with both the development technique and outcome pre-determined. Designing for Ugandan women requires a different design approach, one that is responsive and open to switching trajectories, exploring women’s holistic daily experience, and incorporating alternative perspectives.

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DeclarativeStatements_v5:
Critically informed design demands oscillation between the field and studio working environments, each of which require designers to balance drastically different methods and modes of imagining.

Market-driven and dominant ICT4D strategies are skewed in favor of those who are positioned a certain way in society, whether through wealth, race, gender, or skills. In order to serve women, technology development needs to start from the ambitions, priorities, and daily context of women.

Rather than pre-determining technology development outcomes for women, discerning how technology can be a tool for women requires a reactive design approach that switches trajectories; searches for the unexpected; and incorporates alternative perspectives.

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